Theme Sessions

Theme session A, Monday 11.00 – 12.30

A1 Digitalisation for aging bridges

Bart Luiten (TNO, The Netherlands), Jens Sandager Jensen (COWI, Denmark)

As in many European countries, a major part of the assets in civil infrastructure in the Netherlands has been built during the 1965-1975 construction peak. Many of the bridges from that period are at the end of their structural, economical and/or functional end of life. Asset owners are faced with the challenge to accelerate the future proving of these aging bridges in a safe, sustainable and efficient way. In this session we will explore the many opportunities digitalisation of asset management processes offers to cope with this challenge.

A2 Monitoring

Henk Akkermans (Tilburg University, The Netherlands)

Monitoring will enable us to predict future behavior of infrastructures, to ensure safety and to predict optimal intervention moments for maintenance and replacement. New technologies on data collection, sensoring and monitoring techniques are presented and their role in Life Cycle management is discussed.

A3 LCM of Storm surge barriers

Alexander Bakker (RWS/TU Delft, The Netherlands), Martine van den Boomen (Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences / TU Delft, The Netherlands)

A storm surge barrier is a movable barrier that can be closed temporarily to prevent the water levels behind to exceed certain dangerous levels. Typically, strict requirements are applied for the operational and structural reliability to guarantee the safety of the area behind against flooding. Meeting these strict requirements can however be challenging because of the sometimes limited maintenance windows, the infrequent operation and the fact that many barriers are unique-in-its-kind. Besides, as a result of sea level rise and socio-economic developments, requirements and hydraulic loadings can substantially change during the life time of the barrier. This session welcomes all topics related to the life cycle management of storm surge barriers, such as maintenance, asset and knowledge management, risk assessment and life time extension.

A4 Sustainability

Henk Jonkers & Mitsuyoshi Akiyama

The growth in welfare in the past decades had an enormous impact on the environment and on our natural resources. It is a great challenge to find new ways to reduce the impact to the planet in the future. This session deals with possibilities to reduce the impact to our planet and to become more sustainable.

Theme session B, Monday 13.45 – 15.15

B1 Multi-modal network (game)

Robin Neef (University of Groningen, The Netherlands) & Tim Busscher (University of Groningen, The Netherlands)

Infrastructure networks are an essential part of our daily lives. They are so self-evident that we mainly notice them when they stop functioning. In this game, you are the manager of a transport infrastructure network, and it is your challenge to keep it functioning. You must monitor the ageing, performance, finances, satisfaction, and potential expansion of the network. To make it even more complicated, you will also face developments in the surrounding networks. Networks are increasingly interconnected, and developments in the rail network, for example, affect the highway network and vice versa. These interdependencies are often seen as difficult and complex but offer excellent collaboration opportunities. How will you keep your network alive?

B2 Quay walls

Martine van den Boomen (Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences / TU Delft, The Netherlands), Mandy Korff (Deltares / TU Delft, The Netherlands)

Quay walls are indispensable for a liveable society and a thriving economy. These capital-intensive structures with long lifespans, have a long history and much variety. The themed session on quay walls welcomes a broad spectrum of topics focused on the lifecycle management of quay walls. This includes construction, maintenance, life extension, and replacement of quay walls with subjects such as monitoring, data analysis, decision-making, asset management, failure mechanisms, condition degradation, structural innovations, structural safety, and sustainable construction. We encourage professionals and scholars to present their applied research,  innovations and best practices.

B3 Bridges

Fabio Biondini (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)

Asset management of bridges and infrastructure systems is a high priority for public authorities and managing bodies due to the detrimental impact of aging and deterioration processes and exposure to multiple hazards under climate change. This theme session deals with multi-disciplinary risk-based life-cycle-oriented criteria, methodologies, and tools to inform the decision-making process for rational allocation of limited resources and efficient prioritization of bridge maintenance and repair interventions at infrastructure scale.

B4 Antea masterclass

Giel Klanker (Antea Group, The Netherlands)

In this mini masterclass, we give a vision on the implementation of Life Cycle Management: because despite the fact that the added value of LCM is seen in managing organizations, the real change that is needed for this often does not materialize. In this masterclass, we will show positive practical experiences and discuss how you can get started with Life Cycle Management in small steps and how this contributes to pride in the maintenance management profession.

Theme session C, Monday 15.45 – 17.15

C1 Multimodal networks (Game)

Robin Neef (University of Groningen, The Netherlands) & Tim Busscher (University of Groningen, The Netherlands)

Infrastructure networks are an essential part of our daily lives. They are so self-evident that we mainly notice them when they stop functioning. In this game, you are the manager of a transport infrastructure network, and it is your challenge to keep it functioning. You must monitor the ageing, performance, finances, satisfaction, and potential expansion of the network. To make it even more complicated, you will also face developments in the surrounding networks. Networks are increasingly interconnected, and developments in the rail network, for example, affect the highway network and vice versa. These interdependencies are often seen as difficult and complex but offer excellent collaboration opportunities. How will you keep your network alive?

C2 Pavements

Mirella Vianella & Greet Leeghwater

This session deals with life cycle management of pavement. Aspects like life time prediction and modeling, life cycle optimal maintenance strategies, and reduction of environmental impact on pavementworks are discussed in this session.

C3 Structural performance

Chairs: to be announced

Prediction of the reliability and performance of ageing structures becomes of increasing importance. Many structures worldwide are in bad condition, but often the financial means are lacking to deal with this. At the same time loading conditions change due to increasing traffic and climate change. This is why there is an urgent need for more explicit modeling of structural performance and expected changes of structural performance in time.

C4 Antea master class

Giel Klanker (Antea Group, The Netherlands)

In this mini masterclass, we give a vision on the implementation of Life Cycle Management: because despite the fact that the added value of LCM is seen in managing organizations, the real change that is needed for this often does not materialize. In this masterclass, we will show positive practical experiences and discuss how you can get started with Life Cycle Management in small steps and how this contributes to pride in the maintenance management profession.

Theme session D, Tuesday 11:00 – 12.30

D1 LCC/LCM tooling (RWS)

Jaap Bakker (RWS, The Netherlands), Rob Treiture (RWS, The Netherlands)

Implementation of LCC: There are many good examples on how to supportdecisions using LCC. Most of these examples are the results of pilots, researchprojects and theoretical papers. But which of these tools and methodologiesreach the operational processes? We will ask this question to different clientorganizations.

D2 Underground utilities

Leon Older – Scholtenhuis (University of Twente, The Netherlands)

Many infrastructure assets are exposed to harsh conditions that influence the integrity of materials, limit accessibility for inspection, and create uncertainties in planning maintenance activities. Although the material conditions of buried infrastructure networks, such as energy pipeline networks, telecommunication cables, water lines, and sanitation systems, are generally simpler compared to large civil engineering assets, the key challenge for these networks arises from their invisibility. Disparate networks have been deployed over many decades, and are owned by different operators. Loss of data about locations and functional conditions hampers sound decision making about construction and replacement, while the underground environment becomes even more congested due to construction of new energy and broadband networks. This further complicates the situation and increases the risk of damage to existing infrastructure. This session invites professionals and asset managers for presentations and a closing panel discussion about how contemporary (digital) technology could support life cycle management of utilities. Technologies such as real-time network monitoring, pipe condition assessment, advanced detection and registration, and data-driven tools for utility strike avoidance are addressed and placed in the perspectives of authorities that are responsible for integrated life cycle coordination and ensuring public safety.

D3 Hydraulic structures

Esra Bektas (TNO, The Netherlands) & Martijn de Jong (RWS, The Netherlands)

This theme session is co-organized by TNO and Rijkswaterstaat to explore together what the current major challenges mean specifically for Hydraulic structures and to what extent they can be transformed to major innovations or collaboration opportunities. Challenges are such as End of Life Decision Making, Climate Change, Digitalisation, or any other that you would like to bring to the table on hydraulic structures. We start with a short presentation on our on-going knowledge project, where we aim to create portfolio knowledge of navigation locks based on available data through utilizing the Semantic Web technologies to support prioritization for replacement and renovation program of Rijkswaterstaat. We use this as an opening presentation learn from colleagues working on abovementioned challenges and to make connections between organisations for further collaboration opportunities.

D4 Railroads

Irina Stipanovic (University of Twente, The Netherlands) & Noemi Jimenez Redondo (Cemosa, Spain)

Railways are a crucial mode of transportation, known for their safety, sustainability, and cost-effectiveness. Nevertheless, climate change effects like extreme temperatures, flooding, drought, rising sea levels, etc. combined with aging infrastructure and increased loads pose significant risks to railway infrastructure. A key challenge for railway infrastructure managers is how to optimize maintenance  planning under climate change threats and budget constraints. In this session we will discuss main concerns and possible solutions.

Theme session E, Tuesday 13:30 - 15:00

E1 LCC/LCM tooling (RWS)

Jaap Bakker (RWS, The Netherlands), Rob Treiture (RWS, The Netherlands)

Implementation of LCC: There are many good examples on how to supportdecisions using LCC. Most of these examples are the results of pilots, researchprojects and theoretical papers. But which of these tools and methodologiesreach the operational processes? We will ask this question to different clientorganizations.

E2 Resilience

Agnieszka Bigaj van Vliet (TNO, The Netherlands) & Diego Allaix (TNO, The Netherlands)

Resillience of infrastructure to changes in exposition and natural hazards during the lifecycle of a structure becomes an increasingly important issue. Ageing structures may no longer be used in a manner that was expected during design. Natural hazards, for instance due to climate change, may induce loads on structures that where not anticipated during design. Resilience is an important topic these days, and progress needs to be made to deal with the challenges of today and the challenges in the near future.

E3 Organization and processes

Jenne van der velde (RWS & TU Delft, The Netherlands)

This session deals with the organizational complexity of Life Cycle Management, with a focus on multi-model networks. Multi-model networks deals with interacting modalities. Often networks are managed independently, but in practice, these networks interact. If one network fails, the performance of other networks can be influenced. New technologies help us to model interacting networks, and to look at resilience of interacting systems.

E4 — Vacant —

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